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Användare som besöker denna kategori: Inga registrerade användare och 2 gäster

How to prove language skills via Swedish health care provider?

Accreditation, permit of residence, Swedish language, licensing, specialist training, et cetera.

23 aug 2016, 09:48

So it seems Socialstyrelsen is now formally requiring documentation on the applicants language skills.

From their web page http://legitimation.socialstyrelsen.se/en/educated-within-eu-or-eea/doctor-of-medicine/how-you-can-prove-your-language-skills
How to prove your skills in Swedish
For example, you can prove your language skills by submitting a passing grade or approved results from

- Swedish at Level C1 in accordance with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
- Swedish, level 3 or Swedish as a foreign language, level 3 for example from Komvux (upper secondary adult education).
- Another course or a test that makes you eligible for studying at a Swedish university/college, see antagning.se.

You can also prove your language skills by letting a health care provider confirm that you have reached Swedish at Level C1 (What does this even mean!? :konfys: How are people suppose to do this if they're abroad and wanting to come to Sweden? Anyone with personal experience on how this works?).


Their is a guy (Dennis31) on this forum who experiences the paradoxal situation that may aries when applying for a Swedish medical license from abroad (see the thread http://läkarstudent.se/forum/viewtopic.php?p=23078#p23078).
In short, he's interested in working in Dalarna, where they "only" require lever B2 in language skills and are also willing to provide language courses in order to boost their employees language skills. So the whole situation is a bitt odd. I've asked Dennis to keep us posted on how things play out.

For people living in Sweden, attending a Swedish course, this is probably less of a problem, but for all those who's not it seems to be a bit more tricky. Anyone else out there who has run in to problems with this? Or perhaps it's all easy-piece-lemon-squeezy?
another visitor